I've heard this unit quoted frequently when talking around terminal velocity, which is I think 32 metres per second per second, however what does that actually mean?


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So metres per second is a measurement of speed, and also so 32 metres per second per second is saying the speed of the object increases by 32m/s (metres per second) eincredibly second. Also spoken as metres per second squared.

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Which likewise happens to be the unit for acceleration. It represents how easily the rate is altering (whereas velocity represents exactly how conveniently the position changes).


Separate from terminal velocity is acceleration. Gravity on Earth increases at 32 feet per second per second (additionally the same as 32 feet/second squared).

So, if something is in midair.

At 0 seconds, it's falling at 0 feet per second.

After 1 second, it's falling at 32 feet per second.

After 2 secs, it's falling at 64 feet per second.

After 3 secs, it's falling at 96 feet per second.

After 4 secs, it's falling at 128 feet per second.

Eincredibly second, the rate enhanced by 32 feet per second - so the acceleration is 32 feet per second per second. Get it?


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level 2
· 2y

A physics teacher I when had renoted that 90% of physics troubles are multiplying quantities together till the systems come out best. This is an excellent instance of that in activity.


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level 1
· 2y

wouldnt that suppose the secs cancel out, or are u talking bout per second squared


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level 2
· 2y

(a/b)/c = (a/b)*(1/c)


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level 1
· 2y
Velocity is in a unit of meters per second. It's a rate of readjust of place. Acceleration such as because of gravity is the price of change of velocity which is a velocity per second measurement which if you perform the math from that is meters per second per second.


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level 1
· 2y

It would certainly typically be an acceleration. In various other words, velocity is changing at 32 ft/s per second.


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level 1
· 2y

Velocity is meters per second. Acceleration, a readjust in velocity, is measured in meters per second per second (ie "speed" per second)


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level 1
· 2y

No. Meters per second implies Change in distance per second (ie velocity). Terminal velocity is meters per second. Velocity per second is acceleration i.e. (meters per second) per second


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level 1
· 2y
Real fake skilled

Speed is a readjust in distance, measured in (distance) per second. Acceleration is a adjust of speed, measured in (speed) per second. We can replace the speed in the second equation to offer us (distance per second) per second. So basically saying X meters per second per second means that you are changing your speed X metres per second.


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level 1
· 2y

Acceleration. 20 feet per second per second suggests the rate is changing by 20 feet per second eextremely second.


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level 1
· 2y

Terminal velocity (for a falling object) is the speed at which something stops speeding up. Basically, the wind resistance slowing dvery own the object is equal to the acceleration from gravity, so the net effect is that it does accelerate or decelerate, and also it drops at the very same rate.


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level 1
· 2y

It just adds per second to the rate to quantify the price of acceleration.

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level 1
· 2y

It's going up in "per second" for eexceptionally second that passes. The first "per second" is for the speed, whereas the second "per second" is the buildup of rate.


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