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Ped Egg helped make at home removing dead skin popular with their manual callus remover by the same name. It worked similar to a cheese grater and continued effort on your part would help remove unsightly cracked heels and dry skin. You will likely remember their advertisements asking you:

Are you embarrassed by ugly feet in sexy sandals?

Ped Egg are back at it again with the Ped Egg Power. And this time the callus remover does all the work for you. But is the Ped Egg Power any good?

Spoiler: It sucks.

If you are looking for a good yet affordable electric callus remover, there are better options. The Emjoi Micro-Pedi Nano we reviewed is the best budget callus remover. If you have a bit more cash to spend I recommend checking out the Amope Pedi Perfect that we also tested.

If you want more details on what we didn’t like about this callus remover then read on!

Unboxing the Ped Egg Power

Like many other electric callus removers, the Ped Egg Power comes in plastic clamshell packaging:


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Normally I dislike this type of packaging. Although it looks pretty on the shelf, it is darn impossible to open. So difficult in fact that attempting to open it can give you the very calluses that the product is designed to remove.

I was pleased that the packaging had a perforated opening on the rear, allowing me to open the packaging with my bare hands.


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This is what will be waiting for you in the box of your brand new Ped Egg Power:


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Lets break it down:

Ped Egg Power handleCoarse roller headScouchsurfingcook.comth roller headInstruction Manual

In the box there was also a “special mail-in offer” on replacement rollers for $9.99 plus postage and handling. Ignore this, you can pick replacement rollers up in stores or online at a cheaper price.

Examining the Ped Egg Power

The first feeling you will have when you lay your eyes upon the Ped Egg Power is cheap and nasty. I have reviewed all the major brands of electric callus removers and this was the first to make me cringe.

You won’t have to look to closely to see that the plastic is of poor quality. The edges are rough and the base on mine even had a sharp bur. Even the logo isn’t straight:


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Off to a great start.

Located front and center on the Ped Egg Power handle is the power button:


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As you would expect, you slide the button up to turn it on and down to turn it off.

Sliding the button feels loose and unresponsive. There isn’t even a locking feature to stop the Ped Egg Pro from turning on by mistake.

Further down the handle you will find a second button:


This is the battery cover release button. Pressing down with your thumb and pulling the base with one hand while holding the top of the unit with the other will see the battery cover slide right off.

With the cover removed the battery compartment is revealed, allowing you to install the batteries:


Ped Egg has chosen not to include batteries in the compartment. Which means you are either going to have to rush out to the store to buy some or raid your TV remote.

The Ped Egg Power requires to AA batteries to run. If you plan on it frequently then I recommend Investing in some rechargeable AA batteries and a charge. Doing so will save you money in the long run.

The rear of the Ped Egg Pro is just a plain section of plastic, with the brand name clearly visible:


Let’s take a closer look at the star of the unit, the coarse roller head:


If you look closely you will noticed coarse minerals wrapped around a blue drum (the roller), like sand paper. When you turn the power on the drum will begin to rapidly spin and grind away at your dead skin.

The surface area of the roller is the smallest out of all the different callus removers that I tested. On it’s own this would not be a problem, but the roller also sits recessed below the plastic sides:


The plastic sides will prevent the roller from making proper contact with your skin at certain angles. Coupled with the small sized roller and you get a callus remover that is not very effective for going over larger areas of your skin.

Located on the side of the Ped Egg Power is a small oval button:


If you hold down this button and pull upwards on the roller head you will be able to remove it from the handle. The process isn’t exactly scouchsurfingcook.comth and the head will often put up a fight when you try and pull it out.

Usually Electric callus removers consist of two different parts,a roller and roller holder. The roller head on the Ped Egg Power is a single piece.


Usually Electric callus removers consist of two different parts,a roller and roller holder. The roller head on the Ped Egg Power is a single piece. In our testing we noticed a pattern. Callus removers with this style of head performed worse than those that used the roller and holder design.

You may have noticed that Ped Egg has included two different roller heads in the box:


The blue roller head is the coarser of the two. Ped Egg calls it the Nano Abrasion roller and is used for general callus removal.

The purple roller is designed to scouchsurfingcook.comth your skin. You should use the scouchsurfingcook.comthing roller after using the blue roller to scouchsurfingcook.comth any jagged or coarse pieces of skin left behind. Truth be told, it is likely that you will never use this roller.

Replacement roller heads

With continued use the roller head will begin to wear down. When you notice your Ped Egg powers performance begin to suffer you will need to purchase a replacement roller.

Just how long each roller lasts will entirely depend on the coarseness of your skin and how often you use it.

You will need to be mindful that you will be locked into buying replacement rollers for as long as you continue to use the device.


A box of three replacement rollers cost as much as the whole Ped Egg Power unit. You would think that a cheaper callus remover would have cheaper refills available. Unfortunately this simply isn’t the case.

The refill pack contains two blue Nano Abrasion rollers and one Purple scouchsurfingcook.comthing roller. I would have liked to see a pack available with three blue rollers, since the purple roller will be of no use to many people.

Testing the Ped Egg Power

With batteries installed it was time to take the Ped Egg Pro for a test-drive.


The Ped Egg pro feels like it looks. Cheap and nasty. The bottom of the handle was so roughly finished that it scratched me as I slid my hand over it. Fortunately I was able to file down sharp edge by running a roller head back and forth over it.

When you turn the power on you are greeted with an irregular grinding sound. While other brands of electric callus removes sound loud and powerful, the Ped Egg Power sounds like it is sick and dying.

Roller to foot, the Ped Egg Power was capable of removing thick calluses, albeit slowly. Some testers complained that the standard roller was too coarse for their sensitive skin.

The sides of the roller head really got in the way depending on the angle that you held the roller at and the small surface area of the roller made buffing the heels a longer process than we experience with larger rollers.

Pressing down too hard with the roller will see it stop. While many users complain about this, it is actually a safety measure to prevent you from grinding your skin to the bone. This feature is found on nearly all electric callus removers.

While the box claims that the roller spins at over 2000 times a minute, we found the Ped Egg Power much longer to remove skin than other brand name callus removers.

When you use your Ped Egg Power you may notice what appears to be smoke coming from the head of the unit. Don’t worry, this is actually fine grains of skin dust that has been grinded off your foot.

After testing the Ped Egg Power it immediately became clear just how helpful the vents are on other callus removers. Without them, skin dust builds up inside the unit.

After use there was a generous build up of skin left behind the roller head which had to be cleaned out. Since you cannot wash the Ped Egg Power, removing this build up was quite difficult.

While the Ped Egg Power is hardly good looking, it quickly gets worse with use. The plastic on the handle scratches easy and the logo begins to fade after just a few weeks of use.

Final Thoughts

The Ped Egg Power is a fine example of getting what you pay for. The cheapest brand name electric callus remover on the market failed to impress.

Where do I begin? The Ped Egg Power is made of poor quality plastic, the roller head is ineffective and skin dust builds up inside the unit.

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A very poor effort from Ped Egg. If you want to see Ped Egg’s better attempt (but not perfect) at an electric callus remover then check out our review on the Ped Egg Powerball.